For my part, I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel's sake. The great affair is to move. ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

Thursday, 22 July 2010

Amalfi Walks (1)


After Naples, and before returning to England, we stayed several nights in Amalfi. The Amalfi coast is stunning walking territory. This is the view back along the Valle dei Mulini (Valley of the Mills) towards Amalfi and the Tyrrhenian Sea ...


The landscape was luscious with vineyards and lemon orchards. A stepped, steeply-ascending path led through the hamlets of Chiarito and Pontone, which sweltered in the hot sunshine. After some brief road walking I joined another, more obscure path, which curved round the base of the limestone bluff upon which the elegantly fashionable village of Ravello is built. I climbed to this strange shelter wedged in the lee of the cliff ...


Unseen creatures scuttled in the undergrowth, and black snakes - possibly western whip snakes - shot across the path. This is looking across to the village of Scala ...


A final push up yet more steps and I emerged in Ravello near the monastery of Santa Chiara. I'd met not a single person on my walk. Most visitors to Ravello take the sweaty, jam-packed bus on a circuitous route up the ridge. I know which way I prefer. Here's the view from Ravello's Villa Rufolo, a shot no doubt duplicated by a million other photographers ...



And this is looking out to sea from the belvedere at the Villa Cimbrone, the end point of Ravello's ridge ...

7 comments:

George said...

Sounds like a nice walk! I spent some time in Ravello about thirty-seven years ago and went back with my wife about ten years ago. Yes, I have the photo from the Villa Rufolo. On my first trip, I stayed at the Hotel Belvedere, which was managed by a Senor Caruso, who has long since passed. He was a lovely man who regaled me with stories each evening of what happened at his hotel in the days immediately after the Allied invasion of Salerno.

Another fond memory of Ravello is the night that my wife and I had a lovely dinner in a lovely small restaurant, only to discover after the dinner and several bottles of wine that the establishment did not accept credit cards -- which was a problem because we had very little cash on us at the moment. When I told the lady who owned the restaurant that I would return the next morning with cash, she said, "No.no, it's no problem. You just pay me the next time you and your wife come back to Italy." As you can see, I have nothing but good memories of the place.

The Solitary Walker said...

All the walks I did from Amalfi were absolutely stunning, George. I'd like to go back and spend more time walking there. I like the way the mountains crowd the coastline - you can access the hills very easily. Though there are some stiff climbs. A few minutes up-valley from Amalfi and you see hardly anyone.

Your memories sound fond ones - thanks for sharing them. We enjoyed a really lovely meal on a restaurant terrace in Ravello, too - but the plastic did the deal! I think credit cards are much more universally accepted in Italy now, though some places do still ask for cash if possible.

George said...

If you like the way the mountains crowd the coastline, you should also consider the cinque terre on the Ligurian coast. There is a great path along the coastal cliffs connecting five towns -- Monterosso, Vernazza, Corniglia, Manarola, and Riomaggiore. The views are sensational and the towns are charming. Perhaps you have already been there. If not, keep it on your list.

Laura said...

Lovely post and I enjoyed George's memories as well.

Thank you

The Solitary Walker said...

George - I haven't been to the Cinque Terre, but it looks absolutely gorgeous.

And thanks for dropping by again, Laura...

Lorenzo said...

Two years ago my youngest brother celebrated his wedding in Ravello, at a small but beautiful cooking school overlooking the bay so wonderfully captured in your photos here. We all stayed in Positano and did our travelling by mini-buses. Such a strikingly gorgeous area, that I vowed I would have to return. Now this post seals the deal.

The Solitary Walker said...

It's a gorgeous area, Lorenzo. And would be a wonderful backdrop to a marriage ceremony.