A common man marvels at uncommon things. A wise man marvels at the commonplace. CONFUCIUS

Friday, 8 October 2010

The Lizard


After Land's End I encountered more stunning coastal scenery...



I clambered down to narrow coves harbouring tiny fishing communities...



The rock here is granite, which produces some amazing, frost-shattered formations...



This plaque is a sober reminder of how dangerous the Cornish coastline can be. Many a ship has foundered on its jagged rocks in the middle of a raging storm...



The weather was slowly deteriorating. After a wet and windy Penzance I traced the western edge of the Lizard Peninsula, rounded Lizard Point (the most southerly point of England), and headed roughly north east, through picturesque fishing villages and across drowned river estuaries - called rias - towards Falmouth.

This is Cadgwith. The last time I was there, many years ago, I passed the actress Jenny Agutter in the street. (Remember the film The Railway Children?) I think she owns a cottage close by...



The Lizard is a very special part of England - remote, beautiful, sparsely populated and completely unspoilt. In fact, it was my favourite part of the whole coastal path. This is the area where you find the mineral serpentine, and for days I saw it veining the rocks under my feet, glistening green and red, polished by the passage of a million walking boots...




10 comments:

Caroline Gill said...

I've had so many wonderful holidays here in the Cadgwith/Ruan Minor area. Did you go to Poltesco, with the old serpentine works, I wonder?

Would love to know which little cove features in your photo with the boats on the pebbled shore ...

We once saw a large Leatherback Turtle on the beach at Cadgwith ...

I wonder if you saw any Choughs on your visit?

George said...

I can certainly see why this was your favorite part of the coastal path. The top photo is just stunning — my favorite, I think, of this whole series. Ocean, rock, heather in bloom — what else does one need in life? I also loved the village shots, especially the one with the boats on the beach and the cottages in the background.

Lorenzo said...

Robert, the photos drawn me in to your trail and story as always. In specific reference to the 5th photo with the memorial plaque, it mentions a "life saving rocket apparatus". What is that exactly? Any idea?

The Solitary Walker said...

Didn't see the serpentine works, Caroline. Apparently it's getting more and more difficult to extract, and supplies are being exhausted.

That cove is Penberth - between Porthcurno and Mousehole.

And, yes, I was lucky to see two choughs just before I reached Lizard Point. I heard them first - an unmistakeable call.

George - that whole section from Land's End then round the Lizard to Penzance is very special indeed. Some of the best cliff and rock scenery is there.

Lorenzo - the guy mentioned on the plaque invented a rocket-propelled life-line which could be fired from the shore to a stricken ship, or vice versa, thus aiding the crew to evacuate safely. If you want more technical details, it's all there if you google!

Kiwi Nomad 2008 said...

Goodness Robert... you inspire me more and more as this journey continues. I would love to walk this coastline route one day!

ksam said...

Your making my feet itch...badly, very badly! Love the pictures...can almost hear the wind!

Friko said...

The Cornish Coast is one of creation's marvels.
To walk it is one of mankind's marvels.

fireweed meadow said...

Oooh, I've been waiting eagerly for you to get to this section of the path and to see these photos. The Lizard isn't just my favourite part of the SWC path, it's also one of my favourite places on earth and tied with the Gower Peninsula in Wales for my favourite place in the UK. I've walked the Lizard section twice in late spring and the wildflowers were breathtaking. A truly special place; may it remain that way.

The Solitary Walker said...

Thanks for your comments, Kiwi, Karin and Friko.

Fireweed - I'm afraid I've rushed through the Lizard. Sadly I have few photos of any merit, and the weather was not brilliant. It is an absolutely fantastic place, and, as you say, the springtime flowers are a wonder. Even in late summer there were squills, toadflax, fleabane, sea holly, Hottentot fig - and lots more I couldn't identify as I didn't have my flower guide with me.

Luuuuuua said...

f reusite fotografii,bravo