For my part, I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel's sake. The great affair is to move. ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

Saturday, 27 August 2011

Wall To Wall

The Wall still proved elusive. From a distance these rocks looked promising, but on closer inspection they turned out to be natural, unhewn boulders...




I saw the vallum again, and more clouds, and more cows, but no Wall...




Here's a close-up view of the vallum (with cows)...




Entering the darkly mysterious Stanley Plantation, I felt fleetingly like Henry Morton Stanley on the trail of David Livingstone...




I emerged from the hushed, cathedral atmosphere of the pine wood into dappled sunlight...




Climbing higher, I passed a mosaic of fields, and rough pastures grazed by sheep...




... until, after crossing a small piece of deciduous woodland, I climbed this stile, descended the inviting, green slope behind...




... and stumbled quite unexpectedly on an impressive chunk of Wall. This time there was no mistaking it...




At the end of that first day I retired gratefully to the Hadrian Hotel in the charming village of Wall (yes, really!) with its tranquil village green and its rather Italianate-looking church bell tower...


7 comments:

pilgrimpace said...

Glad you've found the Wall. It's very good to follow your walk with the photos. What sort of load were you carrying?

Andy

ksam said...

Ahhh at last!! Although I had to wonder about the stones at the wall by the Plantation.

Goat said...

This is even better than 'Time Team'. I thought you were going to pull out a mattock!

Ruth said...

Seems someone else was just as excited to find the Wall and named the village after it!

I'm wondering how you find the path, when there isn't any wall? Are those little acorn signs posted all along it?

George said...

Enjoyed the photos and comments, Robert, made all the more special because I was there too. And now that you are at Wall, the real adventure begins.

Survived the hurricane that crossed my corner of the world during the night. Thankfully, we did not suffer any significant damage.

I look forward to your additional posts about the walk.

am said...

That's a lovely countryside to be walking in. Big sky country. Deep blue sky.

The Solitary Walker said...

Fairly light, Andy. No tent, stove, sleeping bag - as I stayed in B&Bs, inns and cheap hotels.

Yes, an authentic piece of Wall at last, Karin! Though in some ways it's a shame about that intrusive signboard...

I had many things in my rucksack, Goat, but a mattock was not one of them!

There are also places called Walltown and Wallsend, Ruth. Logical, really...

Glad about the hurricane, George. The real adventure always begins tomorrow, does it not?

am - the countryside in the central section of the Wall Path is absolutely beautiful. We were fortunate to enjoy really interesting skies, and mesmerising light and shadow play.