For my part, I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel's sake. The great affair is to move. ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

Monday, 28 May 2012

Grateful


Next day the path from Montbonnet to Sauges led stonily up and down through a delightful landscape of deep forest, green meadow, river gorge and volcanic dome...


Although it's the humble dandelion you can see in the picture below,  I was soon to pass fields carpeted with wild daffodils and white narcissi...


In the small settlement of Le Chier I was amazed how the village had resurrected since I'd last come by here four and a half years ago. At that time many of the houses seemed forlorn and tumble-down, the village in its death throes; now most buildings had been sympathetically restored using the local stone. Though perhaps this one still has some way to go...


A descent through woods took me to Saint-Privat d'Allier where I sat outside a bar in the strong sunshine and drank a coffee. Once again Saint-Privat appeared 'smarter' and more prosperous than I remembered it, with numerous chambres d'hôtes and other accommodations...


I wandered on past these three stone crosses...


... and more fields full of wild flowers and trees full of white blossom...


... and sudden long views across green and wooded valleys...


... and felt immensely grateful just to be alive on such a wonderful spring day...

10 comments:

The Weaver of Grass said...

I would certainly share your contentment Robert if I were with you - beautiful views.

Susan Scheid said...

The serene beauty of this walk shines through your photographs and prose, and how lovely that you had the added gift of better weather. I very much look forward to continued installments from your walk.

Suman said...

Enchanting! How that dandelion field seduces me and how I envy you.. You are one fortunate man to be a part of such serene and unblemished nature.

Timecheck said...

The daffodils brought back memories. When we walked that route, they were poking through an unexpected snowfall. You are so fortunate to have them growing wild. Here we must plant bulbs, and then replant in two or three years.

Goat said...

Isn't a long walk all about gratitude amidst the occasional discomfort, pang of self-doubt, blister, lost toenail, (or in my case) stress fracture or Ilio-Tibial Band Syndrome?

Stunning scenery! Good to hear that a walking path can help revitalise an area. I know on the Appalachian Trail and even parts of the Pacific Crest Trail there's a whole seasonal micro-economy based around the time the Bearded Ones limp into town. "Eco-tourism" at its best.

George said...

what a beautiful day, Robert. I suspect you found more than just slender meaning as you walked through these flower-laden meadows and valleys.

Ruth said...

Heartthumping beauty! I agree with Goat that it is heartening to know the walking path is bringing attention in a good way, and improvements are being made, though I never mind seeing ruins when I find them.

The Solitary Walker said...

Thanks, everyone, for walking along with me...

Goat — oh, yes, plenty of discomfort too, par for the course!

ksam said...

I'm glad you took a picture of the humble dandelions...they are actually one of my favorites! Poor misunderstood flower!

The Solitary Walker said...

God bless the humble dandelion, Karin!