For my part, I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel's sake. The great affair is to move. ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

Sunday, 21 October 2012

Quinterview 3



The Passionate Transitory's third quinterview is with Merseyside poet David J Costello. See David's prize-winning poem, Horseshoe Bat, here.

The best poetry can describe the human condition like no other art form. It's no coincidence that at times of great joy or great depression, people who may normally decry poetry invariably look to verse as a voice for their emotions.

David J Costello

David J Costello

5 comments:

Ruth said...

There is a far-reaching confidence in David's poems, the kind of leaps I hope for, with quiet understanding. Very satisfying indeed. Of course the one on the Bosphorus really struck a chord. When we lived in Istanbul, I don't know how many ferry sinkings were reported, but too many. And I have to say here to David, you got the sense perfectly that I have had about any sort of rescue effort when we lived there: this assumption of drowning. Wow.

The Solitary Walker said...

Yes, there's a precise imagination at work here, isn't there?

Mailfordjc said...

Thank you for your generous comments, Ruth. I enjoyed your poems as well. Your use of language and ability to turn a phrase is very appealing to me. I suspect we're both trying to touch the same thing. I look forward to reading more of your work in the future.

George said...

Enjoyed the interview with David, as well as the three poems published on TPT. Like Ruth, I was especially moved by the spare design and deep meaning of "Moonlight on the Bosphorus."

The Solitary Walker said...

Yes, I agree , George, I think there's a lot going on in that poem — and in such a small space. Same for the first poem, 'Miracle', which seems to bring in multi-layered meanings, and concentrates a density which is still transparent. Hard to achieve this.