I’ve never done anything but dream. This, and this alone, has been the meaning of my life. My only real concern has been my inner life. FERNANDO PESSOA

Thursday, 13 December 2012

South West Coast Path. Day 14: Lyme Regis to Chideock

After a comfortable night at The Albany Guest House, Lyme Regis, I climbed a hill, crossed a golf course, then followed the road down to Charmouth. Charmouth is famous for its fossils. This is the view looking west along Charmouth beach.  

And this is the view looking east, where most of the fossils can be found. 

Because of the varying weather and tides, the beach changes continuously, and new fossils see the light every day.

Part of a rather impressive ammonite.

And here's my own little ammonite I found in the sand and put in my pocket. It actually measures only 1cm across.

After spending an hour or two fossil hunting on the beach I walked on to Golden Cap, the highest point on England's southern coast. This is the view back towards Charmouth.  

And this is the trig pillar on the summit of Golden Cap. Later I spent the night with Mick and Sue at their delightful Rose Cottage B&B in Chideock. I'd heard that the best place to eat was the George Inn. It did not disappoint. I ordered the pub's legendary 'Chideock Egg' as a starter (a Scotch egg with chorizo), followed by hake in parsley sauce with boiled potatoes and vegetables.

8 comments:

Ruth said...

Well this is all serenely beautiful, which you deserved after all that mayhem. The ammonite is sweet, and dinner sounds divine.

The Solitary Walker said...

Yes, that dinner was great, Ruth. And that ammonite is around 100 million years old...

Nick said...

Just caught up with your latest walk. You're beginning to make me nostalgic for England's west country. When you get to the section of the walk from Porthcurno to Porthgwarra and on to Nanjizel - my spiritual home - it's all going to become to much for a poor dweller in far away Croatia. I look forward to it!

Ruth said...

Astonishing! Then let me be more deferential. That ammonite is downright gorgeous for something of her age! (or any age)

George said...

What an interesting day for you, and, like Ruth, I'm in awe of the 100 million year-old ammonite. How on earth can something so tiny retain its magnificent, original design after so many millennia of earth's turmoil. One 1cm in diameter, yet it gives me so much hope.

The Solitary Walker said...

Thanks for your visit, Nick. I'm glad it's all bringing back good memories for you. Though re. Porthcurno etc., you'll have a long wait — I'm walking west to east! (The Cornish section was covered two years ago — see the link to it on my right-hand sidebar.)

I've just checked out the facts, Ruth — and actually that ammonite may be 200 million years old! It's difficult to get one's mind around that, isn't it?

Yes, George — it's 1cm of awe-inspiring symmetry and perfection.

am said...

Wow! The ammonite fossil! Today is the day I met my Richard on the California coast in 1966 when we were 17 years old. He gave me a split polished ammonite pair for my 52nd birthday. He would have loved seeing your photos from this particular walk! It has been a joy to follow along on this ocean walk.

The Solitary Walker said...

Thanks, am.