The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeing new landscapes, but in having new eyes. MARCEL PROUST

If the doors of perception were cleansed every thing would appear to man as it is, Infinite. WILLIAM BLAKE

Wanderer, there is no way; the way is made by walking. ANTONIO MACHADO

Saturday, 8 December 2012

South West Coast Path. Day 4: Bantham To Salcombe

The next day was cold, clear and sunny — the best weather I'd had so far. (After this a fast-moving depression would set in, streaming from the south-west, and causing all the West Country gales and floods which subsequently became headline news.) For the moment, though, the sea was calm and blue. I left Bantham and The Sloop Inn at 9.00 am and noted Burgh Island once more — this time seen from the opposite side of the estuary.  

Burgh Island. (The sea really was as blue as this.)

The route skirted Thurlestone Golf Course (golf courses are just as common as caravan parks round here) then led down to South Milton Sands where there is a nature reserve.  

Reed-fringed lake at Milton Sands' Nature Reserve.

With Milton Sands now behind me...

... I soon approached Hope Cove and the settlements of Outer Hope (the new village) and Inner Hope (the old village). 

Living in Hope.

A spectacular path roller coastered the cliffs between the headlands of Bolt Tail and Bolt Head. Some of the views inland were just as gorgeous... 

... as the seaward panoramas.

Soar Mill Cove.

Looking back towards Soar Mill Cove and Cathole Cliff...

It was a steep climb up to these shattered granite outcrops...


7 comments:

Ruth said...

Robert, my heart rose higher with every image. Can't we stay here at the top in the sun a while?

Goat said...

This looks like a beautiful section. Shame about the golf courses. I don't think I've done a long walk anywhere in the world where I haven't had to bypass them along the way. I reckon in an enlightened future (if there's one in store) people will will look back and ask, "What possessed people to do that?" Could be worse though, I suppose - I've also had to pass speedways in the middle of nowhere and army explosives testing grounds!

The Solitary Walker said...

Yes, we can, Ruth... but you'll need your thermals. It's damn cold up there!

Goat: taking into account the golf courses, the caravan parks and the military firing ranges ubiquitous in these parts — there's still a little unspoilt natural beauty left, thank goodness. (Did you know Bob Dylan was rumoured to have taken up golf at one time? Yes, that staggered me too!)

George said...

What a wonderful day that must have been! Great views in every direction, including inland. I especially like the second photo of the reed-fringed lake.

Martin said...

Golf courses, could be useful for a wild camp one pleasant spring night?

I've really enjoyed this series, making me feel impatient for the Spring to I can get out and about for a couple of over-nighters.

Oh, you need to tell us what you drink when you stop for a pint. A local bitter I'd hope?

Vagabonde said...

What magnifique landscape. I am not much of a writer but if I lived among such beauty I think I could start to write poetry…

The Solitary Walker said...

Thanks for your comments George, Martin and Vagabonde.

Martin, I hate golf courses — sorry, any golfing readers out there — but they certainly could be useful for a neat wild camp. (Providing you strike camp at crack of dawn — those keen golfing types do start their strange rituals bloody early.) As for the tipple — why, local real ale, of course!