The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeing new landscapes, but in having new eyes. MARCEL PROUST

If the doors of perception were cleansed every thing would appear to man as it is, Infinite. WILLIAM BLAKE

Wanderer, there is no way; the way is made by walking. ANTONIO MACHADO

Sunday, 10 February 2013

The Tannahill Weavers



Back from seeing Scottish traditional folk band The Tannahill Weavers in the village hall at Dry Doddington, a village near us. They closed with this version of Auld Lang Syne by Robbie Burns. There was not an empty seat, and everyone had a great time.

7 comments:

George said...

Very nice — much nicer that the version we hear in the U.S. every New Year's Eve. This sounds so much closer to the original.

The Solitary Walker said...

It was a really enjoyable evening with friends. Music, good company, a flask of coffee. Who could wish for anything more?

Dominic Rivron said...

Why is Doddington Dry?

The Solitary Walker said...

As someone said last night, Dominic, it sounds rather like a skin condition ( 'I've got a slight touch of the Dry Doddington's) to which one might have to apply something like a poultice. Actually, I've no idea. There's a pub, so that's not the reason.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Dry Doddington?
Any relation to the other Doddington?

Dominic Rivron said...

A little research uncovered the fact that the name means: "the dry estate of a man called Dodda", although why the estate of the man Dodda was dry is anyone's guess. A quick dig around suggests it might at least go back to the Normans and French place-names that include "sec" (e.g., Secheville).

The Solitary Walker said...

Off the top of my head, the word 'Dodda' suggests to me a Viking name, Dominic (lots of Viking influence round here) rather than Norman — I'm thinking of the word 'Edda', the old Norse collection of poetry and myth.