Someone once said that God offers man the choice between repose and truth: he can not have both. PETER MATTHIESSEN

Sunday, 10 February 2013

The Tannahill Weavers



Back from seeing Scottish traditional folk band The Tannahill Weavers in the village hall at Dry Doddington, a village near us. They closed with this version of Auld Lang Syne by Robbie Burns. There was not an empty seat, and everyone had a great time.

7 comments:

George said...

Very nice — much nicer that the version we hear in the U.S. every New Year's Eve. This sounds so much closer to the original.

The Solitary Walker said...

It was a really enjoyable evening with friends. Music, good company, a flask of coffee. Who could wish for anything more?

Dominic Rivron said...

Why is Doddington Dry?

The Solitary Walker said...

As someone said last night, Dominic, it sounds rather like a skin condition ( 'I've got a slight touch of the Dry Doddington's) to which one might have to apply something like a poultice. Actually, I've no idea. There's a pub, so that's not the reason.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Dry Doddington?
Any relation to the other Doddington?

Dominic Rivron said...

A little research uncovered the fact that the name means: "the dry estate of a man called Dodda", although why the estate of the man Dodda was dry is anyone's guess. A quick dig around suggests it might at least go back to the Normans and French place-names that include "sec" (e.g., Secheville).

The Solitary Walker said...

Off the top of my head, the word 'Dodda' suggests to me a Viking name, Dominic (lots of Viking influence round here) rather than Norman — I'm thinking of the word 'Edda', the old Norse collection of poetry and myth.