The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeing new landscapes, but in having new eyes. MARCEL PROUST

Saturday, 24 August 2013

Woolsthorpe Manor

Although Sir Isaac Newton did not exactly invent gravity, as he did calculus and the reflecting telescope, he did famously discover the effects of gravity, after an apple fell on his head. An apple from this very apple tree, in fact.

Mind those falling apples, kids.

It stands in the garden of Newton's birthplace, Woolsthorpe Manor, which we visited on Thursday. Although the house was interesting, we found the National Trust café of equal appeal.

Karen, Carmen and Dominic (from the blog Made out of Words) enjoying a cup of tea at Woolsthorpe Manor.

5 comments:

Dominic Rivron said...

Aha! 15 minutes of fame!

I went there fascinated by the fact that the near-mythical tree still stands and left fascinated instead by Newton's "list of sins" he'd committed.

Making pies on a Sunday night?!

dritanje said...

THE apple tree?! Well one can only be amazed. I'd like to see Newton's list of sins too. Mine today is - not working, reading blogs and putting up photos instead.

The Solitary Walker said...

Those 'sins' were fascinating, Dominic. I wish I could remember them all. I'll try and trace them on Google.

Dritanje — these are indeed most lamentable sins, no mere peccadilloes. You must atone by working for 24 hours non-stop on Monday and refraining to read blogs for a week!

am said...

Wonderful triple portrait of Karen, Carmen and Dominic!

The Solitary Walker said...

Thanks, am!