For my part, I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel's sake. The great affair is to move. ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

Saturday, 11 October 2014

Day 35: Lausanne To Vevey (2)

It was a very warm afternoon, there was sunshine on the lake, and ribbons of cotton-wool cloud clung to the ridges of the lower Alps. Pierre and I had left Lausanne and were now beginning our walk to Vevey. The path hugged the shore, and was continually interesting as it wriggled its way between land and water. We passed inlets and marinas . . .  

 . . . and folk who were were swimming, sunbathing . . . 

. . . and generally enjoying themselves.

Sometimes the path stayed low, on the level of road and railway . . .

. . . and sometimes it climbed high, threading a route through the Côtes de Lavaux, Switzerland's largest area of vineyards. 

Hillside home above the lake. Doesn't this house seem like a natural part of the landscape, almost organically grown from the rock? 

Heading down to the church in Saint-Saphorin.

Finally we arrived at the campsite, 'La Pichette', just before Vevey. How's this for an idyllic camping spot? You can see two German cyclist-campers in the photo, but Pierre, Peter (yes, we'd caught up with him) and I were pitched close by. 
The view from my tent was unforgettable, and the sunset more amazing still . . . 

The light changed minute by minute . . .

. . . until the lake shimmered pink and pewter, as the sinking sun gave one last fiery glow . . . 

7 comments:

Susan Scheid said...

So beautiful! Thank you so much for taking us on your walk.

Bouncing Bertie said...

Such luxuriant landscapes. I guess a pilgrimage does not have to be all about austerity!
Cheers, Gail.

George said...

I could hang out for a couple of hundred years in this part of the world. I'll take that house built into the rocks, a perfect integration of man and nature.

Phreerunner said...

Hello Robert
Having got months behind with the blogs I follow, I've just enjoyed catching up with yours.
Your trip sounds fascinating despite too many roads, and far from 'Solitary'. Well done, I'll enjoy reading the rest of your entries (which had me fooled for a while into wondering how you were managing to blog so professionally as you went along!)
We must have been close to you as we returned through France at the end of July.
Martin

The Solitary Walker said...

Thanks Susan, Gail and George for continuing to accompany me on my epic journey! Yes, austerity has its place — but so does indulgence!

Hi Martin — and I'm pleased you enjoyed the account. Not too far till the Italian border now. As you now realise, I'm blogging retrospectively!

Ruth Mowry said...

Every statement's an understatement! Unbelievably and gloriously beautiful! The light on those rapturous scenes! Ahhhhh!!

The Solitary Walker said...

The changing light was amazing that evening, Ruth. So special.