For my part, I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel's sake. The great affair is to move. ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON

Tuesday, 27 October 2015

Chatsworth

A dull, grey but magnificently autumnal day in Derbyshire's Peak District. This is the river Derwent . . .

. . . here running placidly by Chatsworth House, home to the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire. Chatsworth is one of England's finest stately homes. On the right you can see the Emperor Fountain, designed by Joseph Paxton in 1844. This was a massive construction project, and involved the creation of a lake on high ground behind the garden to supply the water pressure. It was finished in only six months. It was built for the impending visit of Tsar Nicholas I of Russia, but in the end he never came. In its day this was the world's highest fountain; in the photo it's only at minimal flow.

Chatsworth House between two oak trees in seasonal foliage.
Behind these splendid copper-leaved trees lies James Paine's Three Arch Bridge . . . 

. . . based on a Roman design.

Looking back at the river Derwent and the Chatsworth estate . . .

Leaving Chatsworth through Stand Wood, we approached a gate leading to a moorland access path . . .

. . . from where we admired this superb view across the Derwent valley . . . 

9 comments:

Bouncing Bertie said...

Wonderful, just wonderful. I now realise that I was taken to Chatsworth at too early an age, before I was able to put it in context and appreciate quite what a masterpiece of architecture and landscaping it is. Another visit is overdue. Thanks for the reminder!
Cheers, Gail.

Ruth said...

"They gradually ascended for half a mile, and then found themselves at the top of a considerable eminence, where the wood ceased, and the eye was instantly caught by Pemberley House, situated on the opposite side of a valley, into which the road with some abruptness wound. It was a large, handsome, stone building, standing well on rising ground, and backed by a ridge of high woody hills;—and in front, a stream of some natural importance was swelled into greater, but without any artificial appearance. Its banks were neither formal, nor falsely adorned. Elizabeth was delighted. She had never seen a place where nature had done more, or where natural beauty had been so little counteracted by an awkward taste. They were all of them warm in her admiration; and at that moment she felt that to be mistress of Pemberley might be something!"

I've always wanted to see this place since they used Chatsworth in the BBC miniseries version of P&P. How beautiful and fortunate for you to visit.

George said...

A wonderful post, Robert, with absolutely stunning images of the landscape. It appears that you have returned from Italy to the U.K. Where goest thou next? Whatever the case, I wish you well. It's always a pleasure to follow your peregrinations throughout the world.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Beautiful Derbyshire Autumnal glory Robert I add to George's comments above too.

The Solitary Walker said...

Thanks, everyone, for your comments! Yes, I'm now back in the UK, George, having walked from the Alps to Lucca in Aug/Sep.

dritanje said...

Chatsworth House, amazingly built in only 6 months. And then the Tzar never came. Ah well, it's still lovely and the grounds and the autumn trees are just gorgeous. It seems to me that autumn this year is particularly vivid. And I wonder if I always think that. Whether or not I do, it's still very lovely to see, every day.

The Solitary Walker said...

Sorry to be a little unclear, Dritanje — it was the fountain constructed in only six months, not the house itself.

And yes — this autumns seems particularly vivid to me also.

dritanje said...

Ah no, it was me who mis-read, I went back to check, yes of course, the fountain only took 6 months, and I was thinking it was the house!

Unknown said...

Although its a wonderful place and beautiful house does anyone any thoughts on the eco system around the house. The grounds around the house have very little wildlife except deer and sheep that munch away creating the huge lawn.
I visited today and was blown away by the house and private gardens but disappointed by the barren landscape. They need to re wild it perhaps?